African Markets – Factors to watch on Oct 4 – Reuters

NAIROBI, Oct 4 (Reuters) – The following company
announcements, scheduled economic indicators, debt and currency
market moves and political events may affect African markets on
Tuesday.
– – – – –
EVENTS:
* SOUTH AFRICA – South Africa’s Treasury auctions 2.35
billion rand worth of 2031, 2037 and 2048 bonds.

GLOBAL MARKETS
Asian shares wobbled on Tuesday after fading hopes for a
reduced Deutsche Bank fine and rising expectations of a U.S.
interest rate hike pressured Wall Street.

WORLD OIL PRICES
Oil prices dipped early on Tuesday, weighed down by a rise
in Iranian exports that adds to a global supply overhang,
although a planned OPEC-led supply cut later this year has
lent crude some support.

EMERGING MARKETS
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AFRICA STOCKS
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SOUTH AFRICA MARKETS
South Africa’s rand and bonds firmed on Monday
after the finance minister said the economy may be over the
worst of its downturn and took a further boost from upbeat
Chinese manufacturing data. Stocks were weaker .

SOUTH AFRICA RATES
The end of South Africa’s interest rate hiking cycle may be
in sight if inflation conditions remain consistent with
latest forecasts, but the bar for loosening policy is high,
the central bank said on Monday.

NIGERIA CENTRAL BANK
Nigeria’s central bank will pursue price stability as an
anchor for economic growth and attract foreign investors as
the country battles recession and rising inflation, its
governor said in a magazine interview.

IVORY COAST COCOA
Heavy rain persisted last week in most of Ivory Coast’s main
cocoa growing regions, boosting crop development but causing
some farmers to fear flooding and disease as they begin to
harvest.

MOZAMBIQUE BANK
Mozambique’s banking system is “in good health”, a senior
central bank official said on Monday, after a liquidity
crunch and bailout of the southern African nation’s
fourth-biggest lender, Moza Banco.

SIERRA LEONE
Sierra Leone will cut the cost of running its government by
30 percent to try to tackle an economic crisis triggered by
falls in commodity prices and the aftermath of an Ebola
epidemic, President Ernest Bai Koroma said in a statement.